TERMINATOR: GENISYS [a Film Review]

Terminator: Genisys is the latest summer blockbuster hop on the band wagon of films to restart an old franchise that may have become obsolete due to bad sequels.

After the “expected-unexpected” rip-roaring success of Jurassic World in re-energising a 90s classic, people are looking to this 2015 update to the 80s franchise about a war across times between man and machine. With a star-studded cast featuring some of the newest members to grace the silver screen, this film is set to re-popularise the one-liner, “I’ll be back”.

The introduction is quick to introduce the whole premise of the Terminator world and proceed to bring us back to 1984, the year that mattered. Undoubtedly, within the first half-hour, you would know that this is going to take place during the events of Terminator 2: Judgement Day. But that is where things start to change. The line between the good and evil has dissipated. The timeline has been reset (or rather, taken a different path).

Emilia Clarke, of Game of Thrones fame, stars as Sarah Connor, which was originally portrayed by Linda Hamilton in the first two installments of the franchise. Jai Courtney (A Good Day to Die Hard) co-stars as Kyle Reese. Jason Clarke (Dawn of the Planet of the Apes) portrays John Connor, but there is something different about this version of the supposed “prophet/savior” for mankind. Although the main story revolves around the three of them, ultimately, it is the returning Arnold Schwarzenegger, who portrays a T-800 (similar to all his other roles in the franchise) programmed to protect Sarah, that stole the spotlight. Admittedly, he IS the reason people are watching this film.

Terminator: Genisys not just serves as an opportunity for a reboot in the timeline, but seeks to recapture the audience who fell in love with the 80s classics. Truthfully, although still uncomparable to the classics, it does have a better plot and hope of another sequel than the later films in 2003 and 2009,which is not saying much. Full of action and subtle attempts at humour, this would be a good film to catch during this summer.

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